At the beginning of August, British superyacht specialist, Pendennis welcomed an exceptional classic to its facility in Falmouth, Cornwall for a major restoration project. Built in 1931 by British shipyard, Camper & Nicholsons, 59m Marala will spend the next 18 months undergoing a rigorous renovation programme to restore her to her former glory.

Having been custom built to an incredibly high standard, with naval architecture and exterior design from Charles E. Nicholson, Marala holds a unique and interesting history.

Due to a shortage of warships at the beginning of World War II, the Royal Navy needed suitable vessels to join the fleet. Alongside increasing British boat production, yachts such as Marala were converted in to armed vessels, to reinforce the British fleet. In this case, Marala, which at the time belonged to English aircraft manufacturer, Richard Fairey, was converted and commissioned to the British Royal Navy, under the name HMS Evadne.

The yacht’s service history began as a moderately-armed vessel to support merchant cruisers, and then continued to focus on anti-submarine patrols, for which she was converted in early 1940.

The yacht’s service history began as a moderately-armed vessel to support merchant cruisers, and then continued to focus on anti-submarine patrols, for which she was converted in early 1940. After the vessel was decommissioned from service in the mid 40s, the vessel was then reinstated as a private yacht.

Given the age of the yacht, there have been relatively few owners of Marala, which was put on for sale in 2016 for the first time in over 50 years. The new owner, who is said to have recognised the project as a rare opportunity, is keen to retain her classic design and heritage with the restoration project, but also integrate modern systems and technologies on board.

Marala’s new owner recognised the rare opportunity to own a Camper & Nicholsons classic motoryacht but understood that her essential engineering requirements would impact her interior,” says Marala’s captain. “With a determination to remain sympathetic to her heritage and original design, the decision was made to bring the yacht to Pendennis to complete a restoration and preserve her spirit for many years to come.”

Details of the programme of works include upgrades to the yacht’s steelwork, domestic and electrical systems, harnessing modern engineering methods, alongside a new guest area, which has been commissioned to London-based design house, Muza Lab. The shipyard has reported that a new look will be brought to the interior, which will respect and celebrate the 1930s spirit of the vessel.

A number of superstructure modifications will also be made to the vessel, which is intended to restore her profile to a design which is close to the original lines. Marala, will also be completely repainted and her teak decks will also be replaced.

A number of superstructure modifications will also be made to the vessel, which is intended to restore her profile to a design which is close to the original lines.

"Pendennis is renowned the world over as the premier destination to complete a complex restoration project like Marala,” says joint managing director, Mike Carr. “Years of experience working on award-winning projects such as Fair Lady, Shamrock V, Malahne and most recently Haida 1929 has given our 430-strong workforce not only a broad understanding of the complexities of completing a project such as Marala, but also a deep respect for preserving the heritage of these yachts for generations to come. We pride ourselves on being able to sympathetically balance traditional craftsmanship with modern technology, breathing new life into these historic yachts".

Photo credit: Jake Sugden

Profile links

Pendennis


If you like reading our Editors' premium quality journalism on SuperyachtNews.com, you'll love their amazing and insightful opinions and comments in The Superyacht Report. If you’ve never read it, click here to request a sample copy - it's 'A Report Worth Reading'. If you know how good it is, click here to subscribe - it's 'A Report Worth Paying For'.