For the most part, my experience of the superyacht market has been centred around developing content that explores the many aspects of the industry that require improvement. As such, I have often had to adopt a critical eye in order to ensure that the content serves a purpose beyond blind commentary. I will be the first to admit that my knowledge of the industry has, at times, lacked context. However, this all changed during The Burgess Billionaire’s Tour of Thailand.

My previous lack of context was summed up neatly by Jean-Marc Poullet, chairman of Burgess Asia, who said the superyacht market required “exposure, not just education” in order to grow. While Poullet was referring to the growth of superyacht market in Thailand, and, more broadly speaking, Asia, his point still stands. As a journalist, I find myself highly educated, but under exposed. Put simply, I had no first-hand experience of just how incredible life on board a superyacht can be. The odd cocktail reception during Monaco Yacht Show hardly does the superyacht experience justice.

I now count myself among the lucky few who can say that they have experienced life on board a superyacht...

I now count myself among the lucky few who can say that they have experienced life on board a superyacht and, during my time in Thailand, I must admit that it proved particularly difficult to start picking holes in the industry. Don’t misunderstand me, the holes exist, that is plain to see and I will continue to dedicate my professional career to exploring them, but they certainly seem far harder to find when you are with good people and enjoying time on board a superyacht that is operated by a knowledgeable, happy and engaged crew.

During my two days and nights on board Talisman Maiton, the 54m Proteksan Turquoise-built motoryacht that is available to charter through Burgess, not once did I wake up and start fretting about the implications of a trade war or the relative merits of various ownership structures – although later in the trip the rise in tensions between Pakistan and India did give me pause to consider whether or not I would be able to make it home. The same can be said of my time on board Titania, the 72m Lürssen that is also available for charter with Burgess, and my time at the Anantara Layan Phuket luxury residences.

Exposure gained, lesson learned. The superyacht experience, when done well, really is hard to beat

Given the nature of online reportage, I don’t have the requisite space within this article to wax lyrical about the trip as a whole – there will be a number of stories appearing online and in print in the coming days, weeks and months that explore the various facets of the trip. But, what I will say, is that somewhere between flying in a private jet with Mjets, delivering aid to the Moken people with Talisman Maiton, water sports on board Titania, and drinking an eye-wateringly expensive 1923 Japanese whisky at Anantara Residences, Layan Phuket, I got it.

Exposure gained, lesson learned. The superyacht experience, when done well, really is hard to beat. And, for anyone who feels this article is a touch sycophantic, I challenge you to visit The Superyacht Group’s Instagram account (click here) and find fault in my claims.

Special thanks to Burgess, Anantara Layan Phuket, MJets and the teams on board Talisman Maiton and Titania for opening my eyes and providing me with a good dose of context.

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