Stefano Pastrovich - all images by Andrew Johansson

MONACO, Port Hercule. At this year’s Monaco Grand Prix weekend, Pastrovich Studio invited a handful of industry professionals to its office to reveal a new approach to its design process. In a moment of silence on the racetrack, principal designer and founder of the studio Stefano Pastrovich explained the new thinking.

“We wanted to share what we do and are trying to achieve with our friends and the journalist and brokerage community,” began the Italian designer, as he stood at the front of the studio, which is on the 15th floor of Le Panorama and offers beautiful views of the marina. “The Monaco Grand Prix is a good opportunity to show how we do things and more importantly why we do them. What we are presenting to the market is how we will approach projects and our clients going forward.”


Mercedes F1 car during the race on the Sunday

The result is the development of four ‘class’ types, each category designed to represent a particular personality. The first of these is the Parkour Class, which represents the kind of character that strives to overcome barriers and aims to push the limits of technology and design, leading to a sleek exterior and high-tech interior. The designer pointed to the studio’s latest concept, the 90m X-Kid Stuff (published in SuperyachtDesign, Q19) as an example of a concept that would fulfill this.

The next category is the Backpacker Class, which is suited to a client that enjoys exploring the world in comfort. Pastrovich explained that the type of owner that fits this category would not necessarily be interested in fashion but would place more importance on the practical side of life. The result would be a vessel packed with toys and equipment that would allow for easy access to the water and land.


The four classes by Pastrovich Studio

From the practical to the elegant, the Dressage Class encompasses everything to do with luxury. This class focuses on high quality and is less focused on speed and performance. It expresses the more formal side of life, while the final of the four categories, the Freeride Class, looks at the sportier aspects of a client’s life. It aims to highlight the dynamic nature of a sportsman while packaging this in a cool yet stylish way.

 “Everybody is different and their tastes vary hugely,” said Pastrovich. “It is for this reason that we have created these four class categories and placed all our existing and new projects into them.”


Pastrovich entertaining guests

While these classes highlight certain characteristics, Pastrovich was keen to stress that not every client would conform to a specific class. Instead this new approach is merely a tool to aid the initial design process and to ensure the concept truly reflects what the owner wants. Once this is established, the project can be development and combined with the latest in technology.

“We don’t just sell designs, we sell designs and technology together in order to better serve the owner,” Pastrovich said. “We do a lot of research to see where technology is today and how this could be incorporated into tomorrow’s yacht. At the end of the day, I want a client to be able to come into the studio, point out the type of person he is and his passions and from there we can create his yacht.”

Ways in which technology can be used to enhance design is the focus of Materialist in SuperyachtDesign Q19, and will be discussed at this year’s SuperyachtDESIGN Week. James O'Callaghan of Eckersley O'Callaghan, Guglielmo Carra and Jan Wurm from Arup will discuss the latest developments in the world of materials today and how these will influence the yachts of tomorrow.

To find out more about Pastrovich’s philosophy and approach, make sure you don’t miss SuperyachtDesign Q20, where the Italian studio takes the focus for Case Study.

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