After a variety of delicious drinks and meals held at selected Lunch Hotspot showrooms such as Black & Key and Mckinnon & Harris, the afternoon began in much the same way the morning ended. From three o’clock to half past four the doors to the workshops were opened once again. The material up for discussion in these sessions ranged from how senior crew would alter superyacht design to minutiae of classification and compliance.

When should crew get involved in the design of a yacht? It's a question often asked — but less often when pertaining to interior crew. It was this that ex-chief stewardess and founder of Yacht Design Solutions, Agis Variani addressed in the afternoon's 'Crew Focus on Design' think tank. Her answer was clear: chief stewardesses should be involved in a yacht's build from day one, which will save time and money; money for the owner, and time for the crew. From laundry room space to islands in the galley, Variani advised designers on what needed to be considered when it comes to efficiency.

Agis Variani: Crew Focus on Design

Two floors down in the Davidson showroom, Svetlana Mojic from Serbian design studio Salt & Water lectured delegates on ‘Unity in the Next Gen’. “The future is how we design it," explained Mojic. In a presentation that went through the studio's recent conceptual project, Mojić explained that the "unity" in design came from looking outside a specific field. One particular example was a floating hotel with catamaran apartments, which can detach and navigate away through inland waterways.

Svetlana Mojic: Unity in the Next Gen

In the second instalment of ‘Meet the Designer’ delegates fought for space in a crowded Summit showroom to listen to the words of John Munford and Cristiano Gatto. Both entering the industry at different times from very different tributaries, Munford and Gatto share a passion for not only designing superyachts, but also creating harmonious living spaces. When it comes to the manner in which a project is completed both superyacht luminaries share a singular vision and principle that outweighs any other — there must be trust between designer and owner.

Andrew Johansson, John Munford and Cristiano Gatto: Meet the Designer

The final workshop option, ‘Class Acts’, lead by Douglas Owen of Lloyd’s Register and, Lewis Christopher and Fiorenzo Spadoni from RINA, focussed on the human element of safety and how designers should factor in this unpredictable element. “Good designs come down to knowing what you need and understanding what you are getting”, Owen concluded. It was also suggested, with resounding agreement in the room that crew should be listened to when considering the functionality of a design.

Lewis Christopher Northcott, Doug Owen and Fiorenzo Spadoni: Class Acts

Before it was time to let the drinks and conversations flow, the lessons for the day were rounded off by a keynote speech delivered by superyacht owner Bill Duker and two members of the PHDesign team. Ken Lieber and Peter Hawrylewicz joined Duker to dicuss the owner designer relationship and Duker’s 70m S/Y Sybaris project that is currently in build at Perini Navi.

Ken Lieber, Peter Hawrylewicz and Bill Duker: Insight into the Process

Duker described the project as one of collaboration; between him and PHDesign, between them and the yard, between art and architecture. Throughout this keynote session, Duker's passion was palpable. But he admitted that when passion and art meet economics there was tension.

Click here to read highlights from day two.

SuperyachtDESIGN Week is proudly sponsored by 
Gold level: Awlgrip and Blohm+Voss Shipyards. Silver level: Clyde & Co and OceanLED. Bronze level: Hacker-Craft, Heirlooms, RINA, SA Baxter Architectural Hardware and ZEZ Fabric