FRANCE, Paris. In the first quarter of 2015 Christian Liaigre, owner and founder of the eponymous interior design studio, released the second volume in a series of books chronicling his studio’s numerous and international luxury home and superyacht projects. The self-titled Liaigre provides wonderfully vivid images and text that concisely justifies each work.

From a modest familial beach house to a lavish Dickensian Kensington home, Liaigre brings his acute sense of modernism to every residence, all the while respecting history, geography and the owner’s wishes. “Our surroundings should function like a work of art, appealing to our emotions, swathing us in security as we cross the threshold,” opens Liaigre.

Liaigre officially arrived on the superyacht scene when he completed the interior of Rupert Murdoch’s 56m sailing yacht Rosehearty (now Audace). Born in the French coastal city of La Rochelle — a venerable production line of design and maritime luminaries — Liaigre was always around and inspired by the ocean.

The designer’s more recent work on board 60m SY Seahawk and 70m SY Vertigo — both featured in the 2014 edition of SuperyachtDESIGNERS — is explored in Liaigre. Between them, both vessels have amassed four awards since their respective deliveries.

Seahawk (image by Camile Gentilse)

More so than their motoryacht cousins, sailing yachts are confined in their use of space, a challenge that Liaigre grapples with when designing Seahawk’s interior. “How to maximise space, always a precious commodity on board a ship, while at the same time guaranteeing adequate privacy?” he says. The solution he finds is to use transparent panelling that separates the sleeping quarters and isolates specific social areas, without altogether closing them off as independent rooms.

Vertigo (image by Mark Seelen)

Vertigo presented an altogether different challenge. “This ship is built for speed,” says Liaigre. “And the subtle elegance of its interior should in no way contradict the need for complete passenger safety.” Everything inside Vertigo is bolted down, storage is concealed and unobtrusive, desks are mounted on steel runners and a ladder has raised edges to make foot placement easier when underway — and yet the interior flows sophisticatedly and produces a sense of minimalist comfort as opposed to a scant need for speed.

Liaigre does not over explain his projects within this book; simple themes and reasoning’s are revealed, but for the most part the images do the work as Liaigre takes you on a multifaceted journey through contemporary design.