The superyacht market is admirably diverse. From voluminous motoryachts to purist sailing yachts, there are vessels that seek out every inch of available space or are tuned for optimum performance in the search for gratification through victory.

The retro side of the market is kept alive by passionate owners and their refit projects, with yachts like the 33m Feadship Santa Maria or old racers like Mariquita, featured in issue 21 of The Superyacht Owner, flying the flag for classic design. What we rarely see are new build projects that purely embrace the aesthetic, limiting the exploration of aesthetics to the outrageous and unrealistic like Zaha Hadids Unique Circle concepts.

Rapsody 110

Rapsody Yachts, the Dutch boat builder known for classically styled cruisers in the 30–50ft sector, has launched its newest concept courtesy of design work by Dykstra Naval Architects. The Rapsody 110 is a 34.8m yacht based on Rapsody’s S-shaped hull and in spite of jumping a huge distance up the size ladder, the 110 is double the length of its nearest constructed sister ship, Rapsody has worked to keep its classic styling firmly in place.

The Rapsody 110 has smooth, classic lines complete with huge tumblehomes and a vast cockpit. Its flush foredeck conceals a garage custom designed to house a supercar, complete with an integrated crane for loading and unloading.

Spirit Yachts P100

The arrival of the Rapsody 110 follows the 30m P100 concept from Spirit Yachts, and while this hardly constitutes a trend it does create a happy cultural diversion from the superyacht norm.

While the official descriptions of both vessels make use of language such as ‘large’, ‘spacious’ and ‘ample’, it is clear to anyone viewing these concepts that size is not a key factor. Perhaps ‘unique’ and ‘life-enhancing’ would be better placed to entice customers who have already owned every other sort of vessel and collect everything from art and cars, to watches and wine.

Like a classic car these vessels might lack the volume and specification of their contemporary competitors, but they more than make up for their shortcomings in terms of style.