According to the IMB’s Piracy and Armed Robbery Against Ships report, released in July of this year, there has been 79 successful and attempted attacks on ships in South East Asia between January-June 2015. These have primarily occurred in Indonesian waters, with Indonesia accounting for 54 of the 79 attacks. [Office1] However, as yet there have been no recorded piracy attacks on superyachts.
 
The figures above represent an increase in piracy of 283 per cent in South East Asia when compared with statistics from January-June 2010 (30 total attacks). There have been no reported attacks in the Gulf of Aden or Somalia during this period, although Africa as a whole has suffered 23 attacks.
 
Of the 79 attacks recorded in South East Asia 61 resulted in boarding and 11 resulted in hijackings.


 With the availability of the Thai Charter License and the country’s implementation of changes to charter costs and crew visas due imminently, the doors to South East Asia are gradually being being opened wider to commercial superyacht activity. The area clearly has huge potential as a cruising market, but could that also increase the risk of a pirate attack on a superyacht?
 
The threat of piracy once lingered at the back of superyachting consciousness for sometime. However, as this threat has never manifested itself in a successful attack, attention has turned to more pressing threats such as cyber security and organised crime. But while the focus may have changed, tchanging cruising patterns mean vigilance is still necessary in certain areas.
 
Their performance ensures that superyachts are rarely at risk when underway. However, of the 72 aforementioned successful attacks, 26 per cent occurred when at anchor, seven per cent occurred when berthed and 67 per cent occurred when underway. The risk to superaychts remains low, but crew vigilance must remain high.