Without question, the alleviated presence of brokerage firms at the Yachts Miami Beach show this year was for an amplified representation at the impending Palm Beach International Boat Show (PBIBS) – a show that, last year, was teeming with qualified buyers.

From the $1.2 billion of yachts set to be on display at PBIBS this year – and a roster of yachts at local Rybovich marina not inordinately incomparable in value and stature – the strong representation in the larger LOA categories of yachts completed on home soil is particularly noteworthy. Most prominently, the 45–50m sector, which comprises nine yachts built on home soil.

The gallery shows the nine US-built 45–50m, sub-500gt motoryachts that will be on display. As you can see, there really is something there for buyers at every level. At the top of the pricing range sit three Christensens between eight and 10-years-old: Casino Royale, Match Point and Lady Joy.

The market value of these vessels is considered to be comparative to the Westport 164 Wabi Sabi, a GRP construction, which is two to four years younger than the above-mentioned Christensens.

Then comes Mia Elise, ­which had a $3 million refit in January 2016, including a paint job and five-year ABS survey. At $40,816/gross ton and seven years old, Mia Elise, on paper, looks to be one of the more competitively priced yachts for sale.

The same goes for Mustang Sally, another Trinity, which is asking $14,559/gross ton less than the comparably aged Casino Royale, the highest priced vessel from the selection.

Towards the bottom of the pricing spectrum are some options that are about 10 years older than the majority of yachts for sale, and/or have a marginally lower volume.

So, considering the US-built 45m+ segment has seen very little in the way of new build activity in recent times, it’s certainly a good opportunity for US loyalists to scour the second-hand market for domestic vessels at a variety of pricing levels.