When one walks through a superyacht, you will often be greeted by none other than yourself, staring back at you from the ultra-varnished and super-lacquered finish of the interior. The pristine style that tends to be associated with superyacht interiors baffles me, not because it’s your own face staring back at you, but because this pristine interior style often puts you on edge rather than at ease. I think it’s interesting that despite trying to promote feelings of comfort and relaxation, this super high-end style is the finish that many superyacht designers opt for.

Don’t get me wrong, I think that super luxury interiors are truly something to behold and I’m always in awe of the stunning masterpieces that have been created by designers in our industry; it’s just one of the elements that make this market extraordinary. There is nothing really like stepping on board a yacht with super luxury interior, it’s fascinating, beautiful and just a pleasure to be in the presence of. For many owners in the superyacht market this is the only way superyachts should be styled.

But, could we start to see more of a toned-down dimension of superyacht interiors? It would seem that a number of designers are looking towards more of a laid back and comfortable style rather than overly lavish interiors. We recently have seen new designs emerge that are centred around promoting comfort relaxation on board, which has a more simplistic and raw finish and much less varnish. I believe it’s a really interesting trend to look out for.

This more comfortable style is about finding that creative balance of a relaxed atmosphere in a luxury but not over-styled way, a sort of beach club chic, which when done well is exceptionally inviting, and works so well in the superyacht industry. Using incredible craftmanship and design, I just think this stripped-back approach is a wonderful facet to superyacht interior design and one that seems to be associated with the next generation of owners.

“While it resonates well in certain cultures that really appreciate this glamorous high glossy interior, there is definitely a group of clients that appreciate this more toned-down style,”

- Bart Bouwhuis, Vripack

Obviously, the luxury element is still there, but this approach is one that is aimed at those looking to relax at sea, with those who are closest to them, and it’s a trend that seems to be becoming more prominent in recent projects. “When you go to a client’s house or chalet, we don’t see this high-end finish super glossy lacquered interiors,” said Bart Bouwhuis, co-director at Vripack in a recent discussion. “Typically, we see very liveable environments. But when we step into the yachting industry we see very glamorous interiors, why?

“While it resonates well in certain cultures that really appreciate this glamorous high glossy interior, there is definitely a group of clients that appreciate this more toned-down style,” explains Bouwhuis.

This approach to design is becoming more prominent in the market, with examples such as the recently delivered 31m M/Y Virgen del Mar VI, by Alia Yachts, which features elegant and casual interiors by British design studio RWD.

So, perhaps a more simplistic approach is what we can expect to see more of in the future? There will always be a market for the ultra-luxury styling, but this is a really cool and exciting trend that is making its way through the industry and certainly one to keep an eye out for.

Image one: Vripack moodboard

 

 


Profile links

Vripack


If you like reading our Editors' premium quality journalism on SuperyachtNews.com, you'll love their amazing and insightful opinions and comments in The Superyacht Report. If you’ve never read it, click here to request a sample copy - it's 'A Report Worth Reading'. If you know how good it is, click here to subscribe - it's 'A Report Worth Paying For'.