Intec Marine Shipyard (Intec) has revealed plans to build a yard using entirely alternative and eco-friendly energies.
 
The Dutch yard plans to install windmills on roofs and build bio-gas tanks and solar panels, so yachts can be constructed in daylight hours using alternative energy.
 
“Building a yacht costs a lot of money – welding, heating, painters, carpentry, air conditioning,” said Alwin Muus. “A 30m costs about 2,500 euros per month; a lot of money. We know how we can work with solar cells and wind energy.”
 
Intec intends to buy a three-hectare site in Den Helder, part of a 90 hectare area owned by the government, through a protracted auction process. Acquisition will depend on an order for one of two 'next generation yachts' also built to run on alternative energy.


Intec will purchase an area within the pictured site in Den Helder, Northern Holland

The venture is undoubtedly ambitious, yet detractors might consider it, instead, a simple example of great resourcefulness and future thinking. Den Helder has all the tools the yard needs – it is home to the companies that build and innovate in alternative energy, such as the vertical windmills that will be installed, and to research group TNO Corrosion and Antifoulings. This company, a leader in the field of research of degradation of materials in maritime conditions, is working with Intec on the development of the yachts' recycling potential, and has shown interest in the yard’s eco design. Its backing adds considerable weight to the scheme. “TNO develops knowledge not for the sake of know-how itself but in order to develop knowledge-based practical applications,” said Muus.


 Vertical windmills shown here above the satellite domes and behind the radar antenna of the 140 Eco yacht will also be used to power the new yard

In Den Helder too is a third very basic yet valuable resource, which Intec (and Jongert before it) will make good use of, cow waste. Farming is the main industry of Den Helder so farmers actively need a means of getting rid of this waste. It creates enough energy to run a yard for an entire day, said Muus.
 
“On bio-gas you can generate a lot of power for shipyard, just running on this you can get energy from 7.30 am until 4.30pm.”


 Bio gas tanks - as seen here at Jongert's Wieringerwerf site - will be part of Intec's yard

Whether or not there is a market now for the yachts, which will be needed in order to build the yard remains in doubt. But the research and findings, which emerge from the TNO collaboration could set a benchmark for projects in the future. The yard plan in itself is an admirable one, showing how the industry is looking outside of its box and towards the global impetus to minimise manufacturing's carbon footprint.
 
Richard Franklin at ECOSuperyacht, commented:
“I am delighted to see anybody moving in the direction of making superyachting more energy efficient and look forward to see how it progresses.”

Related Links

Intec Marine Website
ECOsuperyacht Website

TNO Website